TCD Specialist

Neurological Institute of Los Angeles

A Private Medical Practice located in Beverly Grove, Los Angeles, CA & Los Angeles, CA

Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound is a quick and convenient way to get information about the blood flow through the arteries supplying your brain. Jonathan Eskenazi, MD, and his team at the Neurological Institute of Los Angeles provide TCD in the office, producing high-quality diagnostic imaging followed by an immediate evaluation of your TCD and determining a diagnosis. If you need TCD, call one of the offices in Los Angeles, Maywood, or Glendale, California, or use the online booking feature.

TCD Q&A

What is TCD?

TCD is a noninvasive ultrasound imaging test that provides real-time information about the blood flow in and around your brain. The procedure uses high-frequency sound waves to obtain images of your arteries and determine the speed and direction of blood flowing through the arteries.

How does TCD work?

When you have an ultrasound, a technician uses a device called a transducer to send the sound waves through your skin. The sound waves bounce off the structures they encounter and return to the transducer. Then the transducer sends the information to a computer that translates the information and creates an image.

When might I need a TCD?

TCDs are routinely performed in premature infants to test for brain conditions associated with premature birth. In adults, the team at Neurological Institute of Los Angeles often does a TCD to diagnose and evaluate cerebrovascular conditions such as:

  • Tumors
  • Ischemic stroke
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Vasospasm
  • Cerebral microemboli
  • Transient ischemic attack
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage

TCD can also assess the risk of stroke in people with sickle cell anemia.

What happens during a TCD?

During your TCD, you lie comfortably on your back, or in some cases, you may sit upright in an exam chair. Your technician applies gel to certain areas of your neck and face, such as the base of the skull on your neck, around your cheekbones, or in front of your ear.

The gel may feel cold, but it’s easy to wash off and it serves the important role of helping the sound waves travel through your skin. Then your technician places a handheld transducer against your skin and applies slight pressure until they get a good image on the computer.

During your TCD, your technician moves the transducer around to other locations and changes its position when needed to point the sound waves toward specific blood vessels.

Your TCD takes 30-60 minutes to complete. During that time, you can hear the noise of blood flowing through the arteries as it comes through the ultrasound. Otherwise, you won’t hear any other sounds or feel anything other than the slight pressure of the transducer pressing against your skin.

The image is complete as soon as your TCD is finished. The team can immediately evaluate the results, diagnose any problems, and move forward with treatment.

If you need a TCD, you get exceptional diagnostic results in the office at the Neurological Institute of Los Angeles. Call or book an appointment online today.